#PressforProgress

Gender parity
Be taken as a given
Push in and push on

International Women’s Day 2018: “Now, more than ever, there’s a strong call-to-action to press forward and progress gender parity – #PressforProgress” 🌹

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Mr Opportunity

You who think themselves hunted by witches; who
need their empathy spoon-fed: you really cannot tell
if you have abused your power or pushed your luck?
You don’t understand where her boundaries are, anymore?
Why, poor lamb, they are where they have always been,
if you would only
stop getting your clues and taking your cues
from a world of patriarchal design.
Stop looking up for her. Stop looking down at her. She is
right here. Meet her eyes: she knows
you are both in a prison of Fathers’ makings
and there is a limit to how much she can keep saving you.

 

Keep saying it’s a grey area

His story

On her back; on her knees
At the sink in bare feet
On a pedestal, silent, please
Dangerous angel
Too frigid; too bossy; too keen
Was his story; his glory
His magical chattel
From baby to wife
To invisible burden
Embattled; embargoed
Her scorn and her fury
Her life
As she rattles the bars
And beats hard on the ceilings
Deducing his god rod
Confuses his yardstick
The fairer sex feeling her Mars
As she’s peeling his story
Unsealing her future
In all types of footwear
And favourite bras.

All women

To mark International Women’s Day: extracts from Thunder, Perfect Mind – via (The Nag Hammadi Library) The Gnostic Society

🕯


For I am the first and the last.
I am the honoured one and the scorned one.
I am the whore and the holy one.
I am the wife and the virgin.
I am the mother and the daughter.
I am the members of my mother.
I am the barren one and many are her sons.
I am she whose wedding is great
and I have not taken a husband.
I am the midwife and she who does not bear.
I am the solace of my labor pains.
I am the bride and the bridegroom
and it is my husband who begot me.
I am the mother of my father
and the sister of my husband
and he is my offspring.

I am the silence that is incomprehensible
and the idea whose remembrance is frequent.
I am the voice whose sound is manifold
and the word whose appearance is multiple.
I am the utterance of my name.

For I am knowledge and ignorance.
I am shame and boldness.
I am shameless; I am ashamed.
I am strength and I am fear.
I am war and peace.
Give heed to me.  ⚡

*****

Equality does not patronise

This is my body
This is my mind
This is my soul

All me
All mine

🌹
2015 – there’s a hole in the whole
2014 – ‘Ain’t I a Woman?’

the Day of the Woman

Extract from ‘A Prophecy of the Kingdom of the Soul, mystically called the Day of the Woman’

And now I show you a mystery…

The word which shall come to save the world shall be uttered by a woman.

So that women shall no more lament for their womanhood
but men shall rather say: “O that we had been born women!”

There shall nothing new be told
but that which is ancient shall be interpreted.

Hers is the light of the heavens
and the brightest of the planets of the holy seven.

She is the fourth dimension;
the eyes which enlighten;
the power which draweth inward to God.

And she who is alone
shall bring forth more children to God
than she who hath a husband.

And her kingdom cometh; the day of the exaltation of woman.
There shall be no more reproach…

All things are thine, O Mother of God
All things are thine, O Thou who risest from the sea.
And Thou shalt have dominion over all the worlds.

 

Anna (Bonus) Kingsford, Clothed with the Sun

International Women’s Day

Quote

  ‘Ain’t I a Woman?’ – Sojourner Truth     

That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me any best place! And ain’t I a woman? Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And ain’t I a woman? I could work as much and eat as much as a man – when I could get it – and bear the lash as well! And ain’t I a woman? I have borne thirteen children, and seen most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with my mother’s grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain’t I a woman? Then that little man in black there, he says women can’t have as much rights as men, ’cause Christ wasn’t a woman! Where did your Christ come from? Where did your Christ come from? From God and a woman! Man had nothing to do with Him. If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, these women together ought to be able to turn it back and get it right side up again.

[Sojourner Truth (1797-1883): Extract from Ain’t I A Woman? Delivered 1851 at the Women’s Rights Convention, Akron, Ohio, as poetically recounted later, by Frances Gage, in 1863]

I’ve always loved this poem, not just because it is strong and unapologetic but because it intersects race, class and gender.

Different versions of the speech exist. For background and history, try this link: Women’s Rights National Historical Park https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/content/truth-woman-speech.html